Book Review: Fablehaven by Brandon Mull

RATING: StarStarStar

(Fablehaven #1)

For centuries mystical creatures of all description were gathered into a hidden refuge called Fablehaven to prevent their extinction. The sanctuary survives today as one of the last strongholds of true magic. Enchanting? Absolutely. Exciting? You bet. Safe? Well, actually, quite the opposite.

Kendra and her brother, Seth, have no idea that their grandfather is the current caretaker of Fablehaven. Inside the gated woods, ancient laws keep relative order among greedy trolls, mischievous satyrs, plotting witches, spiteful imps, and jealous fairies. However, when the rules get broken — Seth is a bit too curious and reckless for his own good — powerful forces of evil are unleashed, and Kendra and her brother face the greatest challenge of their lives. To save their family, Fablehaven, and perhaps even the world, Kendra and Seth must find the courage to do what they fear most.

Literary Award: 2011 Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Book Award Nominee

*****

FASCINATING.

I’ve always been a fantasy lover – there’s just something that makes the escape to these books so blissful. Fablehaven is a good quirky read despite my constant irritation for Seth’s character.

The story is easy to follow, the characters are easy to like or dislike, and the twists are suprising but not rave-worthy.

Seth is probably the most stubborn boy i have ever read. He does exactly the opposite when it comes to rules. He challenges everyone & everything. Although i liked how he composes himself in times of distress (compared to Kendra), and his sense of family ties is touching.

Kendra is the smart, goody-two shoe sister of Seth who is very perceptive especially to magical stuff. Her quick thinking and bold heart helped her into saving her family from the malicious witch & demon.

The magical elements are enchanting. From fairies to imps, golem to naiads, trolls to centaurs. The little stories woven by Mull for each of them is very entertaining. I love the words of wisdom that Grandpa, Grandma, Lena and Dale constantly give to Seth & Kendra. It was simple and completely understandable for their age, yet full of depth.

I like Fablehaven but i don’t think i’ll be reading the sequel anytime soon. The magic of the preserve and its inhabitants are not enough for me, i guess.


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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

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Book Review: The Queen’s Thief #4: A Conspiracy of Kings by Megan Whalen Turner

Rating: StarStarStarStar

(The Queen’s Thief #4)

Sophos, under the guidance of yet another tutor, practices his swordplay and strategizes escape scenarios should his father’s villa come under attack. How would he save his mother? His sisters? Himself? Could he reach the horses in time? Where would he go? But nothing prepares him for the day armed men, silent as thieves, swarm the villa courtyard ready to kill, to capture, to kidnap. Sophos, the heir to the throne of Sounis, disappears without a trace.
In Attolia, Eugenides, the new and unlikely king, has never stopped wondering what happened to Sophos. Nor has the Queen of Eddis. They send spies. They pay informants. They appeal to the gods. But as time goes by, it becomes less and less certain that they will ever see their friend alive again.
Across the small peninsula battles are fought, bribes are offered, and conspiracies are set in motion. Darkening the horizon, the Mede Empire threatens, always, from across the sea. And Sophos, anonymous and alone, bides his time. Sophos, drawing on his memories of Gen, Pol, the Magus and Eddis, sets out on an adventure that will change all of their lives forever.

The Thief review | The Queen of Attolia review | The King of Attolia review

***** ***** *****

If I couldn’t be Eddis, I would be Attolia. If they needed to see my uncle in me, then I would show him to them. And I would take Attolia’s advice because if I identified my enemy and destroyed him, Sounis would be safe.

An heir to the throne who lost his mother & sisters, got kidnapped and sold to slavery, grew up to the king he didn’t want to be. Oh, Sophos! you are stronger than i thought.

The author has a strange sense of humor, i’d tell you that.

Sophos is now the narrator of the story. From being exiled to Letnos, to being a slave to an unknowing rebel baron, to being a pawn in the dangerous politics in Attolia, to being ‘imprisoned’ (again) in his own land, and finally, to rising up as the new king of Sounis.

The slavery part is boring, although i symphatized with Sophos’ wonderings – he was content to being a slave. No expections from his father, no breathing down his neck from his uncle. He was not happy but content.

My favorite part would have to be the moment Sophos will be voted for as king by the barons. I was kinda expecting it, but I was surprised Sophos can be so brutal. And i admired that, applauded him even! That is the only action I got from the book, but it was just right.

I miss Eugenides! He was shown being an idiot to Sophos (and i hate him for it) but as usual, Gen has something up his sleeve. The intricate plotting between Gen, Attolia, Eddis and the magus for the upcoming war was brilliant.

Megan Whalen Turner weaves a story that is mysterious, intriguing, and romantic (at times). I have to be on my toes while I was reading her series, because I’ll be lost in understanding all the politics and strategies that made her story worth reading, and rereading.

Sounis had been thinking of Ambiades. “He would have been a better man under different circumstances.”

Gen looked at him. “True enough,” he said. “But does a good man let his circumstances determine his character?”

#2 Off-the-Shelf Reading Challenge 2011

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: Eon by Alison Goodman

Rating: StarStarStarStar

(Eon #1)

She has a powerful secret . . . with deadly consequences.

For years, Eon’s life has been focused on magical study and sword-work, with one goal: that he be chosen as a Dragoneye, an apprentice to one of the twelve energy dragons of good fortune.
But Eon has a dangerous secret: he is actually Eona, a sixteen-year-old girl who has been masquerading as a twelve-year-old boy. Females are forbidden to use Dragon Magic; the penalty is death.
When Eona’s secret threatens to come to light, she and her allies are plunged into grave danger and a struggle for the Imperial throne. Eona must find the strength and inner power to battle those who want to take her magic . . . and her life.

***** ***** *****

This is a great story, but Eon (or Eona) being the heroine and the center of it all is just too painful for me. In short, i don’t like her. If i was the dragon, i would find her unworthy of my powers. Despite my misgivings on the main character, the book is commendable for fantasy readers out there.

Eon is susceptible to emotional blackmail and manipulation. I agree that she is just a teenage girl living in a society where women do not hold power in any way, but her years in training should’ve given her nerves of steel, but it didn’t. She isn’t as strong and likeable as i thought she would be. I wanted to slap and strangle her most of the time i was reading her story.

The strongest character for me would be Ryko, followed by Lady Dela. I’ve underestimated their role due to their social ranking, but when i get past that, i was in awe of their courage and devotion to fight for what is right.

The storyline was built around palace intrigue and dragon lore. Unfortunately, it was focused more on the former rather than the latter which made half of my reading Eon boring and dragging. I was so looking forward to lots of DRAGON MAGIC! But there was only a few. I was elated during the choosing ceremony (ascending dragon will pick his worthy apprentice). Then I was dulled by the palace scenes. It only picked up during Eon’s trial with the King Monsoon. And i was pysched that FINALLY, the author was in a roll. There is no time to put the book down after that.

The twist was a shocking realization for me. The scenes before arriving to that climax finally made sense to me, and it was thrilling! So simple yet clever on the author’s part.

Only after closing the book did i say that i enjoyed Eon’s story. I hope there’s more of Prince Kygo in book two, though. Then i want to smack Dillon full in the face.

Eon inclined more on palace politics than the dragon fantasy it implied on the book cover and blurb. But i would still recommend it for the unique plot.

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: The Queen’s Thief #3: The King of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner

Rating: StarStarStarStar

(The Queen’s Thief #3)

By scheming and theft, the Thief of Eddis has become King of Attolia. Eugenides (yoo-JEN-?-deez) wanted the queen, not the crown, but he finds himself trapped in a web of his own making.

Then he drags a naive young guard into the center of the political maelstrom. Poor Costis knows he is the victim of the king’s caprice, but his contempt for Eugenides slowly turns to grudging respect. Though struggling against his fate, the newly crowned king is much more than he appears. Soon the corrupt Attolian court will learn that its subtle and dangerous intrigue is no match for Eugenides.

Read The Thief (The Queen’s Thief #1) review here.

Read The Queen of Attolia (The Queen’s Thief #2) review here.

***** ***** *****

He did not marry you so he can become king. He became king because he wanted to marry you.

Very engaging read!

This is a really clever series, but this book showed how brilliant Gen is. Despite his physical limitation, Gen is without a doubt is a master of his craft. 🙂 Oh, did i mention i love Gen’s nasty, wicked sense of humor? 😀

The king and queen’s relationship is intriguing. The sudden bursts of affection for each other made me smile. The emotions that the author played for these parts are very real and sometimes, poignant.

Costis – i didn’t like for the most part. He’s a coward to her peers, if you ask me.

And then there are scenes that are too confusing for my simple mind that i need to backtrack reading 2-3 times until they finally dawned at me.

I didn’t also like the constant snickers and underestimations made by Attolians to Eugenides. Only in the last chapter of the book did they gave in and relented to Gen as their king.

The ending came up abrupt for me but it did satisfy the conflict of the story. and that is, for Gen to prove his worth to the Attolians.

Overall, i enjoyed reading this third book! Just when I thought Gen is way over his head, he proved time and again (and again), why a former Thief of Eddis deserves to be King of Attolia – not just as a loving husband to the Queen but as a powerful ruler to the Attolians as well.

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: The Queen’s Thief #2: The Queen of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner

Rating: StarStarStarStarStar

(The Queen’s Thief #2)

…Revenge
When Eugenides, the Thief of Eddis, stole Hamiathes’s Gift, the Queen of Attolia lost more than a mythical relic. She lost face. Everyone knew that Eugenides had outwitted and escaped her. To restore her reputation and reassert her power, the Queen of Attolia will go to any length and accept any help that is offered…she will risk her country to execute the perfect revenge.
…but
Eugenides can steal anything. And he taunts the Queen of Attolia, moving through her strongholds seemingly at will. So Attolia waits, secure in the knowledge that the Thief will slip, that he will haunt her palace one too many times.
…at what price?
When Eugenides finds his small mountain country at war with Attolia, he must steal a man, he must steal a queen, he must steal peace. But his greatest triumph, and his greatest loss, comes in capturing something that the Queen of Attolia thought she had sacrificed long ago…

Read The Thief (The Queen’s Thief #1) review here.

***** ***** *****

FANTASTIC sequel!

I was unprepared with the events that the author threw at me in The Queen of Attolia. The pacing of the story is very different from book 1. And oh, so so much better!

Eugenides is back working for the Queen of Eddis as, of course, the Queen’s Thief. In the first few chapters Eugenides was caught, imprisoned, and suffered the most valuable loss perhaps in his life. I was shocked by this turn of the story. I didn’t know the author had it in her to be so cruel, especially to her hero! I mourned with Gen.

The lull for me came when Gen wallowed in self-pity and despair. These scenes made Gen annoying but brought about the strong character of the Queen of Eddis and what her relationship is like with Gen. He’s not only her Thief, but her cousin, her friend, her family. On those lengths she contemplated going to war with Attolia just for Gen.

The Queen of Attolia was a different thing. Ruthless, shrewd, cruel. She is also a strong character but in a different way from Eddis. I was kinda lost with her reactions to Gen’s antics and taunts. I’m thinking, ‘could it be that…’ nooo, that’s impossible. In the end, i realized that the reason behind might be difficult to fathom, but not impossible. And i believed it.

The action picked up again when Gen started plotting for revenge, err, a plan to counteract the inevitable war of Eddis with Attolia and Sounis. Gen coped up with his loss but not without a cost. His road to self-recovery is admirable, to say the least. And his plans! Wow, they are brilliant, if not perfect. Looove it!

My favorite part of this book? The unexpected love story. It wasn’t even the main plot, but creeps up to be the most essential factor of the story. and man, that did it for me. I was floored by the revelations of both parties. At first, i thought it is part of Gen’s plan but several scenes later, i realized Gen’s not lying! After everything that’s been done to him, he is still capable of loving her that much. Un-freaking-believable! If that’s not love, then i don’t know what is. The last scene melted my heart into a puddle. 😉

There’s also the scene of Gen questioning the actions of the gods. I was like, backing Gen at first, egging him to go and confront them about their failures. In the end, even i was humbled and grateful by answer of the gods. Very nice!

The ending is satisfying for me. The Queen of Attolia really deserves to be queen. Her cunning and acceptance for things as they are deserve praise. *clap clap*

I think i’m going to stall reading The King of Attolia for a while. Why? Well, i want to savor The Queen of Attolia first in all its brutality and sweetness. 🙂

I believe i found a new gem worth listing in my most romantic book ever read. *sigh*

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

Rating: StarStarStar

(The Queen’s Thief #1)

“I can steal anything.”
After Gen’s bragging lands him in the king’s prison, the chances of escape look slim. Then the king’s scholar, the magus, needs the thief’s skill for a seemingly impossible task – to steal a hidden treasure from another land.
To the magus, Gen is just a tool. But Gen is a trickster and a survivor with a plan of his own.

Literary Award: Newberry Honor (1997)

***** ***** *****

i’ve always love fantasy books, more so if there are kings and queens. so i was set on loving this book.

unfortunately, i can hardly see what made The Thief an award-winning book. well… until i reached the last few chapters of it. and i meant it – LAST. FEW. CHAPTERS.

i liked that the opening scene is with Gen already locked up in prison for bragging about stealing the King’s… ??? gosh, even that i can’t remember! so he ended up in the dungeon cells for quite some time.

when the Magus (advisor to the king) approached him offering freedom (sort of) in exchange of stealing something, Gen is more than happy to oblige. though he did not trust the Magus, the opportunity gave him to escape the prison walls.

together with the Magus and his apprentices (plus a bodyguard), Gen was more than dragged to an adventure he never dare to dreamed would be real.

3/4 of the book – slow. slow slow.

all did it for me was to help me keep on turning the pages so i can be rewarded with the slimmest of adventure the book promised me with.

Gen was the typical criminal. hates the Sounis King. hates the Magus. but i want to credit him for his dark humor. snippets of his wits and humor are given by the author and for that, i like him.

At the end, Gen was revealed in his true nature. the thing i loved the most about him is this: his replusion to killing. he’d rather steal than kill. no matter if he is only defending himself, he hated the act of killing. but that doesn’t mean he can’t fight. and ooh, he was very deceitful on that! i love that twist.

I was determined to hate the Magus, but as the story progresses, that hate turned into admiration. then awe. then acceptance. his character is what intrigued me the most.

After trudging the boredom that was almost three quarters of the book, i still think it’s worth the read. The revelations of how and why things were, of who the people were, were shocking.  and it was a GOOD shock. 🙂

I thought this book was in line with The Black Cauldron by Lloyd Alexander (which is also a Newberry Honor awardee), but it doesn’t come close to the adventures of Taran.

But i’ll read The Queen of Attolia first. I’m also interested on the relationship between the Queen and her Thief. *wink*

Perhaps, The Queen’s Thief series will measure up to the Prydain Chronicles i so love.

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: The Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan

Rating: StarStarStarStar

(Kane Chronicles #1)

Since their mother’s death, Carter and Sadie have become near strangers. While Sadie has lived with her grandparents in London, her brother has traveled the world with their father, the brilliant Egyptologist, Dr. Julius Kane.

One night, Dr. Kane brings the siblings together for a “research experiment” at the British Museum, where he hopes to set things right for his family. Instead, he unleashes the Egyptian god Set, who banishes him to oblivion and forces the children to flee for their lives.

Soon, Sadie and Carter discover that the gods of Egypt are waking, and the worst of them —Set— has his sights on the Kanes. To stop him, the siblings embark on a dangerous journey across the globe – a quest that brings them ever closer to the truth about their family and their links to a secret order that has existed since the time of the pharaohs.

Literary Award: A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year (2010)

***** ***** *****

THRILLING RIDE!

It is obvious by now that Rick Riordan is a master of storytelling. From the Percy Jackson series and the Heroes of Olympus series, i had no doubt that reading this Egyptian-mythology concept won’t disappoint.

Carter and Kadie are estranged siblings and there’s a reason why. They are not gods (unlike Riordan’s other series) but they are somewhat entwined with them. They also came from a line of Egyptian magicians that are so ancient they are believed to be more powerful than the current members of The House of Life.

With these descriptions, it is inevitable that they will be tasked to fight Set before his obsession on world domination comes to life. Seems simple? yeah, right. With Riordan, nothing is ever simple. TWIST is is middle name.

From one action-packed scene to another, from one continent to another, it was hard not to like what i read. It is still full of humor.

I like Carter. He’s a goody-two-shoes kinda guy. conforms to his father’s ideals. doesn’t like moving around so often but does not voice it out. nerd when it comes to Egyptian mythology. From losing his dad, to discovering his dad’s other life, to claiming the stage that was set before him by his parents, Carter proved to be worthy as the god Horus. He has his moments, and he shone brightly as the hero that i expected him to be.

I dislike Sadie. She is the reason i only gave this book a 4-star rating. i hate her character. her constant bullying to his older brother Carter annoyed me. she’s like miss high-and-mighty! ugh. there are few times that i laughed about her punchlines, but that’s it. Mr. Riordan, can you put Sadie into Duat? and keep her there!

It was a pretty entertaining read. Khufu is my most loved character. next is Horus.

who knew that Egyptian gods and goddesses are as vindictive, selfish, and manipulative as the Greek ones?

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: Bartimaeus #1: The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud

Rating: StarStarStarStar

Synopsis:

Nathaniel is a boy magician-in-training, sold to the government by his birth parents at the age of five and sent to live as an apprentice to a master. Powerful magicians rule Britain, and its empire, and Nathaniel is told his is the “ultimate sacrifice” for a “noble destiny.” If leaving his parents and erasing his past life isn’t tough enough, Nathaniel’s master, Arthur Underwood, is a cold, condescending, and cruel middle-ranking magician in the Ministry of Internal Affairs. The boy’s only saving grace is the master’s wife, Martha Underwood, who shows him genuine affection that he rewards with fierce devotion. Nathaniel gets along tolerably well over the years in the Underwood household until the summer before his eleventh birthday. Everything changes when he is publicly humiliated by the ruthless magician Simon Lovelace and betrayed by his cowardly master who does not defend him.

Nathaniel vows revenge. In a Faustian fever, he devours magical texts and hones his magic skills, all the while trying to appear subservient to his master. When he musters the strength to summon the 5,000-year-old djinni Bartimaeus to avenge Lovelace by stealing the powerful Amulet of Samarkand, the boy magician plunges into a situation more dangerous and deadly than anything he could ever imagine.

***** ***** *****

I’ll start by saying this is the first time i’ve read something about djinnis. Yes, Bartimaeus, is one. But beware for he is not the kind who grants three wishes. Maybe he will, but he will twist it so that you’ll curse him instead of thanking him. And you don’t need to free him to get those wishes – you have to capture him and make him do what you want.

An apprentice named Nathaniel did just that. In order to get back to a magician, Simon Lovelace, who publicly humiliated him, he summoned the powerful djinni Bartimaeus to do his bidding – steal the amulet ofSamarkandthat is currently in Lovelace’s possession. This summoning is advanced, way over his education. But Nathaniel is confident. Unfortunately, Bartimaeus and other forces have other plans. Suddenly, Nathaniel is caught between pushing through with his revenge and dealing with an old djinni who has the power to crush him. Not to mention the enemies of Bartimaeus he accumulated over time.

Nathaniel is crazy but good crazy. He is intelligent and clever for his age. His rapport with Bartimaeus is such a laugh trip! At the start Nathaniel seemed like any other brat who was reprimanded by an elder – he was vindictive. The urge to revenge was so great that he concocted a plan no apprentice will think of. What, summoning a djinni as old as Bartimaeus and make him do your bidding is just a piece of cake?… not! But as the consequences of his actions unfold, he became contrite, even guilty. In the end, he decided to make things right. And what he did to defeat the enemy will make any master of his very proud.

Bartimaeus is one those characters i love to hate (because he constantly antagonizes the hero) but i’ve come to love. If Nathaniel is a brat, then Bartimaeus is one stubborn, conceited djinni. Sometimes cruel, other times he’s just plain arrogant. A powerful djinni like him can turn an apprentice’s bidding around and into his advantage, right? It is funny how he counteracts Nathaniel’s orders with his defiant actions. His past is intriguing and more so, his character. He admired Nathaniel yet at the same time he planned to get rid of Nathaniel after doing his bidding.

I liked that even as they hate each other, they’ve come to know the story behind their lives and how it led them to where they are. They understood each other despite the hate. I liked that the ending wrapped up with Nathaniel and Bartimaeus looking after each other. Could they have become friends?… nah. That’s pushing it too far. Lol

I wanna know more of Bartimaeus’ past. I wanna know what happens to Nathaniel being an apprentice to a new master. And i wanna know where Nathaniel’s and Bartimaeus’ relationship will go. I’m sure i won’t be disappointed with their bantering. Though i’m rooting for Nathaniel to outwit the djinni… Ha!

This book is witty and funny. Perfect for a summer read.

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: Artemis Fowl #2: The Arctic Incident by Eoin Colfer

Rating: StarStarStarStarStar

Synopsis:

The Arctic Incident sees the slightly older, perhaps slightly more mellow arch-criminal Artemis recovered from his last adventure, richer now that he has his half of a hoard of fairy gold, and happier since the Clarice Starlingesque superfairy Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon returned his mother’s ailing mind to full health.

But there is still much unfinished business: Artemis Fowl Sr. disappeared when a daring escapade designed to free his family from their criminal–not to mention deeply lucrative–past and move the family’s assets into legitimate enterprises went horribly wrong. Held captive by the Mafiya (the Russian organized crime syndicate) for over two years, he has been declared officially dead, but Artemis Jr. knows in his heart (yes, he does have one) that his beloved father is still alive, and he is determined to find him. Meanwhile Captain Short is temporarily on assignment to Customs and Excise as punishment for letting Fowl separate her and her People from their gold and is finding her stakeout duties a little dull. It soon becomes obvious that the pair have need of each other’s considerable skills, and before long they are on track for an adventure that will ultimately have far-reaching consequences for both of them.

***** ***** *****

So i started this series with one thought in mind: a 12-year-old as a master of crime? interesting.

i liked book 1, but this second book is even better.

So Artemis Fowl is cold and hardened on book 1, but it was good to see him in a different light on this sequel.

He never gave up that his father is still alive. He and Butler keep on searching and searching. at last, a sliver of a clue came to them. or rather, a ransom video. it may terrify any kid, but not Artemis Fowl. he was giddy, for this video only represented one thing: HOPE.

Seeing him softened when he talks about his father, looking at how he manages to cooperate with Holly and other LePreCons to get the job done – it was a whole other side of his character and i liked that. the author did not bother to lengthen the mystery of how Artemis became a criminal mastermind. piece by piece (although it’s not all there yet), i begin to understand why Artemis is what he is.

A new character is introduced, Opal. The arch rival of Foaley. Ha! She is one quirky character and i’m looking forward to seeing her in the later books.

There is still a whole lot of action, and a whole lot of manipulation (by Artemis, of course). It was a fun read. I’ll definitely continue reading this series. So on to book 3!

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.: maria :.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”

Book Review: Witch & Wizard #2: The Gift by James Patterson

Rating: StarStarStarStar

Synopsis:

When Whit & Wisty were imprisoned by the wicked forces of the totalitarian regime known as the New Order, they were barely able to escape with their lives. Now part of a hidden community of teens like themselves, Whit and Wisty have established themselves as leaders of the Resistance, willing to sacrifice anything to save kids kidnapped and brutally imprisoned by the New Order.

But the One has other plans in store for them: He needs Wisty, for she is “The One Who Has the Gift.” While trying to figure out what that means, Whit and Wisty’s suspenseful adventures through Overworld and Shadowland lead to a jaw-dropping climax and conclusion: the highly-anticipated fulfillment of the heart-pounding opening prologue of book one… The Execution of the Allgoods.

*****

What the H happened?!?!?! — that was my reaction after hitting the epilogue of the book.

This is an awesome read! But the question posed at the start of the book remained unanswered: what is Wisty’s gift that The One wants it so badly?

reading this felt like jumping from to portal to freaking portal (like Whit & Wisty). i never know where the author will take me. some ride!

i love love LOVE Wisty’s character! very defiant and strong and undeterred despite the unfortunate events that followed them. and believe me, there are loads!

Whit is a good character but is overshadowed by Wisty’s. Admit it, Wisty’s POV is much more fun to read than his.

Byron is a very complicated character. but very, very persistent which is admirable. i found it funny that he claimed he loves Wisty and yet every time he gets an opportunity to be with Wisty, she almost always  has 50/50 chance of dying. =D

i’m quite unsure if the author wants to paint Celia in a light or dark side. i was confused – is she really an ally or an enemy?

This is very fast-paced book. so buckle up and prepare for the N.O. attacks on the Freelanders!

.:maria:.

“giving up is the ultimate tragedy.”